Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


Dramaturgy Intensive in Omaha

On May 23rd and 24th I’ll be joining UNO Professor of Theatre Cindy Melby Phaneuf, Walter Byongsok Chon and Heather Helinksy in teaching a dramaturgy intensive at the University of Nebraska in Omaha. I met Cindy last May while I was serving as a dramaturg at the Great Plains Theatre Conference. She has put together a terrific intensive workshop, which will be led primarily by Walter. I will teach a section on dramaturging classics, using Carolyn Balducci’s adaptation of LYSISTRATA as a text.

This intensive is open to University of Nebraska – Omaha students only. If you are interested in the topic, please contact me at hamiltonlit@hotmail.com, and I will try to accommodate you in the future.

Attached is information on a 2 day intensive part of this summer’s offering for undergraduate and graduate students through the department of Theatre.  There will be 3 professional dramaturgs with MFAs from Yale, Columbia, and Harvard teaching this class with me.  We will meet for 2 intensive days on May 23 and 24—and then the students will participate in the Great Plains Theatre Conference for one day during the week following to see dramaturgs in action.  If a student can find 3 days in May—they can take advantage of this exciting learning opportunity.  The course is THEA 8000 for 3 credit hours—and beyond the days in May—the course will be completed as an independent project.

Questions—email cphaneuf@unomaha.edu or call Dr. Cindy Melby Phaneuf, 402.554.2552



THE HOTEL COLORS

From May 7-25th, the Bushwick Starr in Brooklyn will premiere Eliza Bent’s THE HOTEL COLORS. Eliza’s one of my newest Talfs (Theatre Artists I Love to Follow). As the Associate Editor of AMERICAN THEATRE magazine, Eliza greenlighted an article on my Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! podcast in the October 2012 issue. Brava, Eliza, and thank you!

Here’s the link to her play: http://www.thebushwickstarr.org/CurrentSeason.html

And here’s her play’s website: http://thehotelcolorsplay.wordpress.com/

A Message from Eliza Bent:

I wrote THE HOTEL COLORS during my first semester of graduate school at Brooklyn College. Encouraged by my professor, playwright Mac Wellman, to draw on my knowledge of Italian, I wrote a wry love letter to Italy about the time I spent studying, living and traveling there as an undergraduate in Parma and later as an English teacher in Rome.

In the play six characters converge on a jankity, rundown hostel in the outskirts of Rome. They proceed to spend a curious evening together philosophizing, divulging secrets, having romances and playing party games. There are dance sequences, physical lazzi and original songs.

Characters speak in direct translation from Italian into English. “I’m sorry, but I have to check my email,” becomes “I ask excuse of you, but I must control my email.” An invitation to coffee morphs into, “Would Formal You like to take a coffee with me?” THE HOTEL COLORS portrays eccentric travelers and seekers. The heart of the play is about people coming together and forming unexpected friendships even as they fail—and flail—in their attempts to communicate.

I have produced shows in the past, but THE HOTEL COLORS is by far my biggest project to date. The show will premiere May 7-25 at the Bushwick Starr, an Obie-award winning Off-Off Broadway theatre venue. The Bushwick Starr usually presents work by ensemble theatre companies and it’s a great honor to be the first curated playwright in the theatre’s history.



LONG DISTANCE AFFAIR

Here’s a listing for a digital, interactive, international event produced in the Rough Draft Fest at LaGuardia College in New York City.

http://laguardia.edu/LPAC/Rough-Draft-Fest/

Fri, April 12 @ 2-4*pm; 6:45-8:45*pm • Mainstage Theater

Long Distance Affair (make possible an impossible trip) by Tamilla Woodard and Ana Margineanu of PopUp Theatrics

When theatre meets technology possibilities become endless. In Long Distance Affair, someone across the globe is reaching out exclusively to you. What will be the result when you and a perfect stranger meet with only a computer screen between you? Artists from 5 continents have united to create a virtual adventure just for you. In Long Distance Affair, each audience member experiences 3 “affairs” with actors in different countries performing from the intimacy of their homes. Make a connection with someone far away who might be closer than you think. For full international cast and production credits click here.
*Every half an hour a group of 3 will be admitted to the theater.



THE PERILS OF OBEDIENCE

Here’s the newest offering from director Niegel Smith, one of my Talfs (Theatre Artists I Love to Follow). He is teaming up with visual artist Itziar Barrio, who was born in Bilbao, Spain, and works in New York City.

March 29, 30 | 8pm
Tickets $10, available at www.abronsartscenter.org

The Abrons Arts Center is proud to present Casting THE PERILS OF OBEDIENCE: A Performance, the second stage of visual artist Itziar Barrio’s exploration in power dynamics and constructed situations. Using the methods of casting, the performance will unfold the wills and desires of the actors to succeed and be recognized. By placing them within fictional and non-fictional parameters, whether movie scripts or their own lives, Barrio reveals the production of power through seduction.

Following an open call, actors will audition for four full days with theater director Niegel Smith and will undergo a selection process. Open to the public only during the two final days of callbacks the entire process will be recorded and included in a resulting video piece. Exploring simultaneously the limits and in betweens of theater, film and performance art, the live recording emphasizes the experience that is being created by actors and audience.

The four selected actors will eventually be part of the next phase of THE PERILS OF OBEDIENCE, consisting of building a scene in real time. The first stage of the project was carried out in Spain during BAD, Bilbao Theater and Contemporary Dance Festival in 2010.

The fine line between the persona and the character finds its mirror in the audience, who executes its silent power by being present. Their presence implies a voyeuristic disposition and it functions to unveil the group dynamics and the negotiation of social roles and rules.

Pushing the actors to reveal their limits on stage, underlining the narratives present in any situation the performance frames an experience where conventions are decoded, contemporary fears of domination are confronted, and exhibitionism and social acceptability are critically examined.

THE PERILS OF OBEDIENCE is inspired by Stanley Milgram’s psychological experiments which began in 1961, a few months after the trial of the Nazi Adolf Eichmann. Milgram wished to test how much pain a person would inflict on another simply because this was asked of them for the purposes of a scientific experiment. As Hannah Arendt reminds us that “under conditions of tyranny it is far easier to act than to think”. Barrio analyzes how obedience to a higher authority, even in democracy, can lead to extreme consequences and can involve large numbers of the population.

“…Itziar Barrio is interested in realities and in showing their limitations and ambiguities as truth, through analysis of their forms of representation. So, art, film, television, the performing arts and the Internet take the floor as work tools and objects for experimentation and analysis. Her interest not only lies in the story that upholds the realities but in its recreations, its techniques for showing them or fictionalizing them.”
From the text of the Catalogue LOS PELIGROS DE LA OBEDIENCIA (-1) by Maria Mur Dean, Director of the Art Producer Organization Consonni (Bilbao)

Itziar Barrio was born in Bilbao and lives and works in New York City. Her work has been presented, among other venues, at: ENPAP (European Network for Public Art Producers), ARTIUM Museum (Vitoria), Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (New York), New Museum Festival of Ideas for the New City (New York), Havana Biennial (Cuba), White Box (New York), Cervantes Institute (New York), International Festival Postelectronic Art (Italy), Pist Space (Istanbul), Art for Art`s Sake (Bologna), Gdansk Academy of Arts (Poland), Loop (Barcelona), Sala Rekalde (Bilbao) and Thomas Henry Ross Galerie (Montreal). Barrio has been awarded among others with the First Prize Ertibil (Basque Government), and by Brooklyn Art Council, Spanish Ministry of Culture, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She has attended a number of residencies including Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and The International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP).

Casting THE PERILS OF OBEDIENCE: A Performance is a recipient of NYFA’s Emergency Relief Fund Grant and sponsored by Etxepare Basque Institute.



DEELMAYKER Reading in NYC April 11th

It is my pleasure to invite you to the staged reading of DEELMAYKER by Warren Bodow, which I have dramaturged. Please join us! Reservations required: dramaturgtn@gmail.com.

DEELMAYKER by Warren Bodow

A comedy about 65 year old Bernie Harris, once the go-to guy in the media brokerage business, who struggles to meet the demands of a younger generation—on his own terms.

Presented by The Spiral Theatre Studio/Our Green Rooms Truly Are

Join us for a reading of DEELMAYKER

By Warren Bodow

Directed By Ken Dashow

To be performed at Arts New York,

in the Bruce Mitchell Room, 3rd floor

520 8th Avenue at 7pm on April 11, 2013

RSVP: dramaturgtn@gmail.com

Or call: 212-689-4362

Download our flyer here: DEELMAYKER reading April 11, 2013



THE GUARDIAN Posts Research on UK Women in Theatre

“Women in theatre: how the ‘2:1 problem’ breaks down”

How well are women represented in theatre? New research by the Guardian in collaboration with Elizabeth Freestone shows a mixed picture. Find the full research results here.

(Excerpt)

Shakespeare said that all the world’s a stage – but how well does the theatre really represent women?

New research by the Guardian, in collaboration with Elizabeth Freestone of Pentabus Theatre, shows that women are still badly under represented, with a persistent 2:1 male-to-female ratio.

The research, concentrating on the top 10 subsidised theatres for 2012-13, looked at female representation in a variety of areas from actors employed to the number of playwrights commissioned for the financial year 2011-12. Board of directors, chief executives and creative teams were also examined…

(c) The Guardian.



“What I’m Dreamin’ Of” from JULIA PO

Here’s a terrific song from Andrew Barrett and Ira Antelis’ musical JULIAN PO.

Hunky Bobby the barber is newly married, but dreams of something bigger. Take a listen: http://snd.sc/ZN4ruJ

Julian po photo

https://www.facebook.com/JulianPoNYMF



JULIAN PO at NYMF

Congratulations to Andrew Barrett, one of my TALFs (Theatre Artists I Love to Follow) and his writing partner, the composer Ira Antelis, whose musical JULIAN PO has been chosen for the New York Musical Theatre Festival’s 2013 Next Link Project. This project is NYMF’s primary writer service program. Titles will be seen at the tenth annual New York Musical Theatre Festival, which will run July 8-28 in New York City.

The Next Link Project, according to NYMF, “empowers emerging musical theatre writing teams as both artists and entrepreneurs by providing the training and relationships needed to help them move their musicals from readings to fully-realized productions and to advance their careers by maximizing the exposure they receive in the Festival. Ten of the Festival’s full production slots are reserved for participants in The Next Link Project.”

Participants attend a special weekend-long symposium, featuring seminars on fundraising, marketing, industry outreach and self-producing, led by industry professionals. The writing teams are introduced to potential collaborators, supporters and producers, and receive dramaturgical support from professional literary managers and dramaturgs. Finally, each Next Link show receives financial support in the form of a $5,000 subsidy toward its production in the Festival.

Julian Po
Book and Lyrics by Andrew Barrett
Music by Ira Antelis
Based on the book “La mort de monsieur Golouja” by Branimir Šćepanović
and the screenplay “Julian Po” by Alan Wade
“Julian Po is determined to end his life at sea, but he finds himself stuck in the smallest, strangest town in Middle America. While waiting for a connecting train, Julian makes friendships that start to sway him from his mission, with repercussions no one anticipated. This darkly comic tale is led by four modern-day muses and set to the quintessentially American sounds of pop, rock and bluegrass.”



Andrew Barrett Still Loves SMASH

Thanks again to Andrew Barrett (my TALF) for weighing in on SMASH. Check out his blog at: http://barrettny.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/five-new-reasons-why-i-love-nbcs-smash/

Five New Reasons Why I Love NBC’s “Smash”

Ratings are up, story lines continue to intrigue and hopes are high.  So without further adieu, five new reasons why I love NBC’s “Smash.”

1.  Art vs. Commerce. Not since David Mamet’s “Speed the Plow” has the debate between the dream of the artist vs. the dream of the producer been so honestly depicted.  Many haters have blogged and posted and tweeted how inauthentic “Smash” is (i.e. Season One featured Ivy running through Times Square in her “Heaven on Earth” costume).  The rules and regulations of costume wearing off-stage are not the thing of great drama.  A serious conflict between art and money is great drama.  Based on my own experiences sitting in more than one producer meeting, I was thrilled by the accuracy of the arguments, tensions, and solutions centered on this dramatic conceit.  And it made for great drama Tuesday night.

2.  Urban Cowboy.  Veanne Cox delivers one of the best inside joke one-liners I have ever heard…ever!  And because it’s Veanne Cox, it’s delivered perfectly.  If you haven’t seen this week’s episode of “Smash,” I won’t spoil it.  But for theater folks in the know, I am 100% sure there was a collective gasp followed by a well-deserved guffaw.

3.  Jerry Rand.  To be honest, I don’t know where this storyline is going.  Case in point, if he is in it to ruin “Bombshell,” he’s doing a terrible job since his fight to make it “commercial” is making at least one of the creators happy.  (And by episodes conclusion it would appear both writers are happy).   Still, Michael Cristofer makes for a potentially great villain.  I’m waiting for the J.R. Ewing or Alexis Carrington or even Angela Channing moment of pure evil, and I hope it is as enjoyable as Hagman, Collins and Wyman made their moments.

Come on “Smash.”  You can do it!  You almost had it when Jerry threatened Karen, but here’s hoping that evil will be unleashed on Eileen instead.  With her, you can be guaranteed a martini in the face!

4.  Baz Luhrmann’s “La Boehme” on Broadway. If you’re gonna go fringe, find symbolism from the guy who was totally fringe but succeeded commercially…Baz Luhrmann.  In a nod to his artistically stunning Broadway version of “La Boehme,” “Hit List” borrowed their basement theater set design (see the back wall) from the noir-romantic design from the 2002 Broadway production.

5.  Saturday nights.  Guess what everyone…the show is starting to improve in the ratings.  It’s true.  Here is a encouraging quote from their press release (Go Bob Greenblatt!): “”Smash” is currently building on this week’s lead-in by 29% or 0.2 of a point.  Note that “Smash” continues to add an exceptional amount of viewership via time-shifting…”  So rather than cancel the show outright, NBC is wisely placing the show on Saturday nights.  This will capitalize on the larger number of time-shift viewing they know they are getting.  This is a very smart move inspired by the commercial realities of TV.

And there ya have it.  My five new reasons for loving “Smash.”  What are your reasons for loving the show?  (Besides the too infrequent cameos of Ann Harada!)



Edward Albee at 85

albee7

Happy Birthday to Edward Albee!

Here are some great quotes from his plays and interviews.

“If you have no wounds, how can you know if you’re alive?” — The Play About the Baby

“Sometimes a person has to go a very long distance out of his way to come back a short distance correctly.” — The Zoo Story

“A play is fiction — and fiction is fact distilled into truth.” — In The New York Times, September 18, 1966

“I survive almost any onslaught with a shrug, which must appear as arrogance, but really isn’t because I’m not an arrogant person. When you write a play, you make a set of assumptions — that you have something to say, that you know how to say it, that it’s worth saying, and that maybe someone will come along for the ride. That’s all. And then you go about your business, assuming you’d be the first to know if your talent has collapsed.” — As quoted in Conversations with Edward Albee, 1988 by Philip C. Kolin

“I have been both overpraised and underpraised. I assume by the time I finish writing — and I plan to go on writing until I’m 90 or gaga — it will all equal itself out… You can’t involve yourself with the vicissitudes of fashion or critical response. I’m fairly confident that my work is going to be around for a while. I am pleased and reassured by the fact that a lot of younger playwrights seem to pay me some attention and gain some nourishment from what I do.” — As quoted in Conversations with Edward Albee by Philip C. Kolin, 1988

“The gods too are fond of a joke.” — Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

“What I mean by an educated taste is someone who has the same tastes that I have.”

“Try to get into your own mind a little bit. Figure out what it is you want to do with your life, what you really want to do, who you really are. Don’t waste your life doing something that you’re going to end up being bored with, or feel was futile or a waste of time. It’s your life, live it as fully and as usefully as you possibly can. “Useful” being the most important thing there. Life must be lived usefully, not selfishly. And a usefully lived life is probably going to be, ultimately, more satisfying.” — In an interview with the Academy of Achievement, 2005

Read more quotes at http://flavorwire.com/376889/30-of-edward-albees-greatest-lines