Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


BCWJ Profile of Genne Murphy

Here is my latest Bucks County Womens Journal article. Download it Anne Hamilton’s BCWJ Profile of Genne Murphy.

Profile of Genne Murphy

By Anne M. Hamilton, MFA

Genne Murphy is a rising star in the theatre world. Her plays have been developed or produced in Nebraska, Colorado, New York and Connecticut as well as locally. The Azuka Theatre produced HOPE STREET AND OTHER LONELY PLACES.

Recently, she was honored with the Leah Ryan Fund for Emerging Women Writer’s Award for her play GIANTESS at the Lilly Awards, hosted at the Signature Theater in New York City. The Lilly Awards celebrate significant contributions by women to the American theatre, including 2016 honorees Danai Gurira, Jesse Mueller and Martha Plimpton.

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Murphy has been deeply involved as a writer and arts educator since graduating from Central High. Her many local awards and affiliations include the Philadelphia Young Playwrights, PlayPenn, and the Leeway Foundation Transformation Award/Art and Change Grant.

Originally, she says, the idea for GIANTESS came in a dream: “I was trying to pour water into a tiny glass and it was really annoying. Then all of a sudden I realized, ‘OMG I’m a giant!’ I panicked, woke up. [The dream] really stuck with me–that idea of being so discombobulated and feeling extremely uncomfortable in your body. I thought there were a lot of interesting metaphors to explore.”

Described by the Leah Ryan FEWW program as having, “truly singular and theatrical voice,” Murphy will workshop her play with a few closed-door readings at Primary Stages in New York City and New York Stage and Film before the Fund presents a full public reading in the fall.

“GIANTESS starts with a young woman who is taking care of her ailing, disabled grandmother,” says Murphy. “Early on in the play she discovers a girl her own age in the abandoned factory behind her grandmother’s house – a 30-foot tall giantess. They develop a deepening connection to one another in this very fraught and heightened situation.”

Reflecting on her time with Philadelphia Young Playwrights, she states, “My experience, [as] a student, educator, and staff member enabled the idea of revision – the actual work of revision – to be a less scary prospect.”

She holds a bachelor’s degree from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and is currently an M.F.A. candidate in playwriting at the Yale School of Drama.

Anne Hamilton has 25 years of experience as a dramaturg. She is available for script consultations and career advising through hamiltonlit@hotmail.com.

 



BCWJ Article on Little Black Dress INK

Outside the Lines_UNBOUND posterLittle Black Dress INK

By Anne M. Hamilton, MFA

For the past year I have had the pleasure of being involved in Little Black Dress INK’s Female Playwrights Onstage Project.

Now in its fourth year, the competition is the brainchild of Playwright and Educator Tiffany Antone, who currently resides in Texas. This national festival of new work has a different theme each year and utilizes a peer review process to identify semi-finalists, whose short plays or monologues are then read in different cities across the country. Finalists are chosen from those events. They enjoyed a staged reading at the Los Angeles Theatre Center last year, followed by a production in Arizona in January.

In 2014, the theme was Planting the Seed, and my play OFEM, inspired by my experience as a CSA member at Blooming Glen Farm, was a finalist. It was read in Ithaca, NY, and Los Angeles before being given its premiere in Arizona. Indie Theatre Now will publish OFEM and all the finalists in an online volume of 11 plays.

This year’s theme is Outside the Lines, and my two character drama THE SHOEBOX is a semifinalist. This short play reunites two high school classmates to reminisce in a late night phone call after their homeroom teacher, a nun, has passed away. Theater Unbound in Minneapolis gave it a staged reading along with five other pieces in March. The festival is still unfolding in events across the country.

Tiffany summarizes her goals on her website: “Little Black Dress INK is an experiment in support, inspired by recent revelations in numbers on the subject of just how few female playwrights actually get produced. Through outreach, education, and producing opportunities, Little Black Dress INK strives to create more production opportunities for female playwrights while also strengthening the female playwright network.”

I have found this competition to be a highly effective and rewarding way of reaching those goals. It grows every year, and currently involves 35 new plays and over 60 artists in eight cities. 2016 submission guidelines will be posted on www.littleblackdressink.org on October 1, 2015.

Anne Hamilton has 24 years of experience as a dramaturg. She is available for script consultations and career advising through hamiltonlit@hotmail.com. Her play WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? was performed at The Lost Theatre in London in October, 2014. She will teach a playwriting workshop at the Philadelphia Writers Conference in June 12-14, 2015.

To be published in Anne’s Page & Stage column in the Bucks County Women’s Journal (April/May 2015 issue). www.buckscountywomensjournal.com



WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? on youtube

WATCH HERE – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVUzz0EJq5E

It’s up!  A video of the production of my short play WHO’S ANDY WARHOL?, which was performed at the Lost Theatre in Wandsworth, London on October 24th. This is one of the 10 winning plays from the British Theatre Challenge. the International New Writing Competition by the Sky Blue Theatre Company of Cambridge, England.

WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? portrays a medical crisis which redefines the relationship between two lovers when one contracts transient global amnesia.

I am very happy with the production, especially the actors Chris Towner-Jones as Matt, and Lizzie Stanton as Sarah. What a joy it is to watch my words come to life! I hope that you enjoy this piece produced by Mini Mammoth Films. This is the first of the winning plays to be posted on youtube.

Special thanks to Anne Bartram of Sky Blue, and Rah Petherbridge, the UK-based photographer who took these wonderful stills below.

If you would like to read the play, please contact me at hamiltonlit@hotmail.com. Thank you for watching!

 

©Rah Petherbridge -  Who's Andy Warhol--3

©Rah Petherbridge -  Who's Andy Warhol--6

©Rah Petherbridge -  Who's Andy Warhol--13

©Rah Petherbridge -  Who's Andy Warhol--28



Kia Corthron’s Great Plains Theatre Conference Speech

Playwright Kia Corthron gave a terrific speech as the Honored Playwright at the 2014 Great Plains Theatre Conference. We are privileged to post it here. It is a must-read! Thank you so much, Kia.

Download it here: Kia Corthron’s 2014 Great Plains Theatre Conference Speech

GPTC 2014 Honored Playwright Kia Corthron

GPTC 2014 Honored Playwright Kia Corthron

Kia Corthron was awarded a 2014 Windham Campbell Literature Prize. She is a contributing writer of Steel Hammer performed by Anne Bogart’s SITI Company, developed through ATL/Humana 2014 and premiering at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2015. Corthron’s Life by Asphyxiation, previously produced by Playwrights Horizons, inaugurated the Public Theater’s Public Forum Drama Club last October.

Other plays include A Cool Dip in the Barren Saharan Crick (Playwrights Horizons coproduction with The Play Company and the Culture Project), Trickle (Ensemble Studio Theatre’s Marathon), Moot the Messenger (Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Humana Festival), Light Raise the Roof (New York Theatre Workshop), Snapshot Silhouette (Minneapolis’ Children’s Theatre), Slide Glide the Slippery Slope (ATL Humana, Mark Taper Forum), The Venus de Milo Is Armed (Alabama Shakespeare Festival), Breath, Boom (London’s Royal Court Theatre, Playwrights Horizons, Yale Repertory Theatre, Huntington Theatre and elsewhere), Force Continuum (Atlantic Theater Company), Splash Hatch on the E Going Down (New York Stage and Film, Baltimore’s Center Stage, Yale Rep, London’s Donmar Warehouse), Seeking the Genesis (Goodman Theatre, Manhattan Theatre Club), Digging Eleven (Hartford Stage Company), Wake Up Lou Riser (Delaware Theatre Company), Come Down Burning (American Place Theatre, Long Wharf Theatre), Cage Rhythm (Sightlines/The Point in the Bronx).

Awards and fellowships include the 2012 Lee Reynolds Award (League of Professional Theatre Women), Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Creative Arts Residency (Italy), Dora Maar Residency (France), MacDowell Colony, Siena Arts Institute Visiting Artist (Italy), Playwrights Center’s McKnight National Residency, Masterwork Productions Award, the Wachtmeister Award, Columbia College/Goodman Theatre Fellowship, Barbara Barondess MacLean Foundation Award, AT&T On Stage Award, Daryl Roth Creative Spirit Award, Mark Taper Forum’s Fadiman Award, National Endowment for the Arts/TCG, Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays, New Professional Theatre Playwriting Award, Callaway Award, and in television a Writers Guild Outstanding Drama Series Award and Edgar Allan Poe Award for The Wire.

Most recently Kia has written two new plays, Megastasis and Slingshot, and a novel. She currently serves on the Council of the Dramatists Guild, is a member of the Writers Guild of America, and is an alumnus of New Dramatists.



THE DRAMATIST Magazine – Quiara Alegria Hudes on Subject

THE DRAMATIST - Quiara Alegria Hudes on Subject

Congratulations to Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow!’s Inaugural Podcast guest Quiara Alegria Hudes. She leads off the cover story of this month’s THE DRAMATIST magazine with an article on “Subject”.



OFEM to be Read at the Los Angeles Theatre Center

I’m very excited to announce that my comedic monologue OFEM will be read at the Los Angeles Theatre Center on May 18th at noon, Pacific Standard Time. Sara Israel will serve as the director for my piece.

The event is the 2014 Female Playwrights Onstage Project –  National Festival of New Work. It will be live streamed by HowlRound. It is open to the public, and those in the Los Angeles area may make reservations through http://www.littleblackdressink.org. The address is 514 South Spring Street, Los Angeles. (213) 489-0994, http://www.latc.org.

Many thanks to Tiffany Antone, who created the event to highlight the work of female playwrights under the aegis Little Black Dress INK.

OFEM was read in a regional event on May 4th in an Ithaca, NY event held at Acting Out, produced by Darcy Rose. Professor Cynthia Henderson of Ithaca College directed my piece.

OFEM was in perfect keeping with this year’s theme – Planting the Seed. My character, Sally Parsons, is a farmer in Bucks County, PA, who is announcing a new initiative to take back the fields and farmer’s markets from what she views as an oppressive patriarchy. She makes a passionate speech to roll out the new food movement she has invented. You’ll have to watch online on May 18th to find out what it is. Suffice it to say that Sally is part Rosie the Riveter, part Emma Goldman, and part Susan B. Anthony. Her speech will leave you cheering and laughing.

Planting the Seed LATC poster_web

 

Little Black Dress INK is an experiment in support, inspired by recent revelations in numbers on the subject of just how few female playwrights actually get produced. Through outreach, education, and producing opportunities, Little Black Dress INK strives to create more production opportunities for female playwrights while also strengthening the female playwright network.

Check out The Blog to read up on the playwrights, directors, and other creative people collaborating on Little Black Dress INK’s Female Playwrights ONSTAGE project and the upcoming Planting the Seed new play festival.



HOMEBODIES in Queens, NY April 12th

The New American Voices Festival

@ Queens Theatre

Presents a reading of

Homebodies
Saturday, April 12 – 8pm, in the Studio Theatre
written by Maria Alexandria Beech
Directed by Michelle Bossy

Featuring Olivia Negron*, Claudia Acosta, Cathy Curtain*, Rock Kohli* and Chris Henry Coffee*

A freelance writer and her mother live a quiet and secluded life in New York, except when a frozen chicken and other objects crash on the floor. That’s when a mysterious couple who moved in below knocks on the door. A funny and tender play about life choices and cultural assumptions, with a fascinating group of characters including an ex-lover, an Indian salesman, and a newborn baby.

*member, AEA

To rsvp: http://queenstheatre.org/2013-14-NAV-free-play-reading-series

The Playwright:

Maria Alexandria Beech’s play Infinity Pond, commissioned by Primary Stages and Aspen Theater Masters, was selected for the new Palm Beach Theater Festival. Alex is commissioned to write a play for Teatro Luna in Chicago in 2014, the first play in its Five in Five Series by women playwrights. Her play, Breaking Walls, was produced at The Cherry Lane Theater. Her play, Little Monsters, was produced by Primary Stages and Brandeis Theater Company. Her translation of Eduardo Machado’s The Cook was produced by Stages Theater. Her musical CLASS, with composer Karl Michael Johnson, will be workshopped in Michigan in the summer. Since 2006, Alex has been a member of The Dorothy Strelsin  New American Writers Group at Primary Stages (where she wrote ClassCharity, BondsLittle Monsters, Homebodies, and currently, ISLANDS). She’s also an alum of the Hispanic Playwrights Lab at Intar (Gloria).

Alex earned a BA (cum laude) and Masters in Fine Arts in Playwriting from Columbia University, and a Masters in Fine Arts in Musical Theater Writing from New York University. Her awards include The Aspen Theatre Master’s Visionary Award (2009), and Outstanding New Script Award at the Planet Connections Theater Festivity for What Are You Doing Here(2011). Alex is a member of the Dramatists Guild in New York.

Director:
Michelle Bossy is a New York based director and producer dedicated to bringing new plays to the stage.  She is the Associate Artistic Director of Primary Stages, where she produces new American plays, and where she has also served as Assistant Director, Company Manager, and Artistic Associate. She produced the World Premiere of Dread Awakening and directed and produced the premieres of Un Plugged In (by Brian Pracht); South Beach Rapture (by David Caudle); and Sarajevo’s Child; Cumberland; Low Brow; and Missing Mike Vitelle. Recently, she directed the world premiere of Little Monsters by Maria Alexandria Beech at the Brandeis Theater Company, and High School Confidential for Primary Stages.  She directed developmental readings of Eat Your Heart Out by Courtney Baron (Perry Mansfield New Works Festival), Bicycle Girl by Rogelio Martinez (Repertory Theater of St. Louis), Gloria by Maria Alexandria Beech (EST), Mercy by Adam Szymkowicz, and May Day by Molly Smith Metzler, among many others.  Michelle is the Director of the Dorothy StrelsinNew American Writers Group, where she has worked with over twenty emerging writers. Michelle holds the first undergraduate directing degree from Webster University’s Conservatory of Theatre Arts. She is the Co-Founder and Artistic Director of the Plum Theatre Company. She teaches acting and playwriting for the Einhorn School of Performing Arts (ESPA) and directing for Syracuse University. Member: Lincoln Center Director’s Lab and the League of Professional Theatre Women.

 

 



OFEM by Anne Hamilton to Be Read in Ithaca May 4th

Little Black Dress Ink' new play festival takes place this spring across the country.

I am very pleased that my short play OFEM has been chosen as a semi-finalist for Little Black Dress Ink’s 2014 Female Playwrights Onstage Project. It will be featured in an Ithaca, NY reading on May 4th. If chosen as a finalist, it will have a reading at the Center Theater Group in Los Angeles later this year.

Here is a guest post I wrote for Little Black Dress Ink’s website. It gives a little bit of background on how I was inspired to write OFEM.

OFEM – A Comic Monologue on American Food Attitudes

I have been eating organic food for about fifteen years. I needed to regain some health after the exhaustion I felt after graduating from Columbia University and starting my career as a dramaturg in New York City. I started ordering deliveries from Urban Organics, based in Brooklyn, after a recommendation from Lynn Nottage.

In 2004, I moved to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, a beautiful region filled with farms and natural reserves. I was lucky enough to get in on the ground floor of a Community Supported Agriculture project at Blooming Glen Farm. As a CSA member, I often visited the farm to help with chores, like replanting onions, helping to hang garlic in the barn, and at the end of the season, to pull up tomato vines from the fields so the farmers could prepare the soil for the next season’s planting.

While on the farm, and also while hanging out with health-conscious new friends, I noticed that there is a particularly ferocious atmosphere in Bucks County with regards to food. Some are outright food preachers, espousing one type of diet over another, and some are more low-key but equally obvious about showing their attitudes, usually with a gesture of rolling eyes, or a sharp intake of breath when an opinion is mentioned that they don’t agree with. I’ve never been in a place where food attitudes were so important socially.

One day I was considering this fact, and I started thinking about writing a monologue that would push the envelope on dramatizing the food attitudes of urban and rural Americans.

As a serious example of such dramatization, I remembered an excellent monologue named A CHIP ON MY SHOULDER by Carol K. Mack, which appeared in the League of Professional Women’s New Play Festival in 2009 at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City. In it, a woman named Annie, played by Kathryn A. Layng, gives a speech at a podium thanking Monsanto for its strides in food manipulation and production. She refers to an implanted electronic chip which the company has offered, and is now becoming a normal part of American life. It was a truly intelligent and chilling piece.

With admiration for Carol’s satire, I was inspired to move in the other direction, and my mind took a wildly comic turn. What if a group of female farmers, due to their feminist leanings, decided only grow to food that is round, or round-ish? What if they went further and banished phallic-shaped objects from their diets? What would cause them to do such a thing? And what if we visited them on the day that this new food movement was rolled out to the public?

And so, OFEM, or, the Ovo-Farmer’s Emerging Network was conceived.

Its leader, Sally Parsons, is giving a speech to launch the network, and stands at the podium in iconic magnificence, like Rosie the Riveter and Emma Goldman combined. Her speech has the passion of an early 20th—century union organizing appeal. As she rails against the “Farmer Man”, she goes over the top with a litany of vegetables and fruits which will and will not be grown by OFEM. And at the end, like a suffragette leading the charge to new freedoms and rights, she invites her listeners to participate in the movement and usher in a new era for humanity.

Sally is over the top, and obviously, her message is larger than life, but it makes a point about attitudes toward food consumption, both slightly mocking, and also, deeply respectful, because it points to the power – the anarchism, one could say – of influencing society’s attitudes by taking independent control of food production. I love her enthusiasm. Isn’t it anarchic to make a stand against oppressive food attitudes? And also against mainstream food growth systems, whether they’re corporations, or family businesses?

OFEM expresses what I consider a lot of time to be the silliness and offensiveness exhibited by privileged, wealthy foodies. I want to say to them, “Come on, people, it’s food. It’s nutrition. Be thankful for the hard work of the people who labor to bring it to you.”

At the same time, I respect their choices. Food consumption involves personal, ethical, financial and sometimes medical choices that I might not be aware of.  So in the end, who am I to judge?

I hope that everyone will enjoy Sally’s speech. Who knows? Maybe I’ve created a viable movement! Power to the farmer!

 

 

 



DEELMAYKER – A staged reading near Dallas – tonight

Congratulations to Warren Bodow, whose play DEELMAYKER has won third place in the 3rd Annual McKinney Repertory Theatre’s New Play Competition. It will receive a reading tonight at 7:30pm in McKinney, Texas, just outside of Dallas. I have worked as Warren’s dramaturg to develop the comedy for the past two years. Previously, it received readings in New York City and Tucson, Arizona, before being chosen for this national award.

McKinney Repertory Theatre DEELMAYKER by Warren bodow

DEELMAYKER, the main character’s email address, features the loveable Bernie Harris, a successful 65-year-old media broker who wants to keep on truckin’ but is challenged by a client base that is shrinking and a business environment that is pushing him to the sidelines.  As he struggles to win the trust of a much younger client, and with problems in his marriage, Bernie strives to make the perfect deal, and learns if he has what it takes to face the new realities of a world growing young.

McKinney Repertory Theatre 
111 N. Tennessee Street
McKinney, TX

http://www.mckinneyrep.org/Home_Page.html

Warren G. Bodow is a “second-act” playwright, having turned to this craft following a thirty-year career in broadcasting. He has written six plays, all of which have been produced in festivals or as fully-staged box-office productions. His second play, RACE MUSIC, was performed on Theatre Row and received critical acclaim from The New York Times in 2009. A native of Syracuse, New York, he graduated from Syracuse University and served as chair of the Newhouse School Advisory Board. He lives with his wife, Ellen, in New York City and in Tucson, Arizona. His book THREE SHORT PLAYS ABOUT LOVE was published by Hamilton Dramaturgy Press in 2011.



BCWJ Article – Preparing for Theatre Conferences

Here is my latest article for my Page & Stage column in the Bucks County Women’s Journal. You may download the article here: BCWJ Article – Preparing for Theatre Conferences by Anne Hamilton

Preparing for Theatre Conferences

By Anne M. Hamilton, MFA

Every year I attend the Great Plains Theatre Conference in Omaha, Nebraska. For a week, Metropolitan Community College hosts a multifaceted developmental program which includes productions, five MainStage readings, workshops, and more than twenty PlayLab readings.

The process starts when the conference puts out a call for play submissions in the fall. Plays come in from all over the world, are read and evaluated, and then the final plays are chosen. The process is similar for other play development conferences like Seven Devils, the Last Frontier Theatre Conference, and PlayPenn in Philadelphia.

When playwrights are looking to develop their work, they often send out their scripts to gain the widest range of experience. Having actors, directors and dramaturgs read the scripts in front of an audience allows the playwright to hear her work, and determine which areas are working, and which can be strengthened.

At Great Plains, a team of artists gathers for several rehearsals, and then presents the reading. A panel of professional playwrights, directors, educators and dramaturgs gives the playwright feedback, and then the playwright discusses the play with her assigned dramaturg. During the week, playwrights also take a variety of workshops, writing new work, and learning new approaches to creative inspiration.

As a Guest Artist, I really enjoy getting to know each new work, and then discussing the reading with its creator. Many scripts go on to great success with other festivals and conferences, as well as productions. It is a pleasure to continue a professional relationship with the playwrights, and to support them as they continue their submissions, and apply to professional training programs and graduate schools.

It is in every playwright’s best interest to actively research and submit to developmental workshops and conferences. The theatre starts with a rather level playing field in that every actor has to audition and learn to perform on stage, and every playwright has to submit and have her plays read and performed on stage. A conference can be a marvelous experience which pushes a writer’s career forward, and gives her a refreshing collaborative experience.

Anne Hamilton has 23 years of experience as a dramaturg. She is available for script consultations and career advising through hamiltonlit@hotmail.com. Season Three of Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! launched with an interview with Kate Valk, The Wooster Group’s leading actress.