Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


I WANT TO RUN AWAY WITH YOU Staged Reading

I am thrilled to announce the staged reading of my one-act play I WANT TO RUN AWAY WITH YOU. It is a part of the Dramatists Guild of America Friday Night Footlights series and will be held on Friday, December 16th from 6-7:30 pm in the Mary Rodgers Room at the Dramatists Guild of America, 1501 Broadway (between 43/44th Sts.), Ste. 701, New York, NY 10036. The staged reading is free. Seats are very limited. Please email me at hamiltonlit@hotmail.com to RSVP.

DECEMBER 16, 2016

“I WANT TO RUN AWAY WITH YOU”

BY

 ANNE HAMILTON

Anne Hamilton’s, “I Want To Run Away With You,”

is an absurdist Fable for our time.

In an East Coast psychiatrist’s office, secrets are revealed,

hearts’ desires are divulged and fulfillment

is offered by the most unexpected players.

“I WANT TO RUN AWAY WITH YOU”

DIRECTED BY
ELLEN BARBER

THE CAST IN SPEAKING ORDER

STAGE DIRECTIONS AND THE FATHER…………….MATTHEW SCHOLES

THE DOCTOR……………………………………………..DAVID KUBICKA*

CLAIRE……………………………………………………..ELLEN BARBER*

NORM………………………………………………………NICHOLAS SATTINGER*

*These Actors are appearing, courtesy of Actors‘ Equity Association.

PRINCIPAL STAGED READING DRAMATURGY BY ELLEN BARBER

ORIGINAL PROCESS DRAMATURGY BY WALTER BYONGSOK CHON

TIME ALLOWING, CONVERSATION IS INVITED WITH THE AUTHOR AFTER THE READING.



NNPN Receives Grant

Here is news that will change the way dramaturgs and literary managers function within the next five years.

NNPN Receives Cornerstone Funding for Web-based “New Play Exchange”: $110K Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

WASHINGTON, DC – The NATIONAL NEW PLAY NETWORK (NNPN), the country’s alliance of non-profit theaters that champions the development, production, and continued life of new plays, proudly announces a two-year $110,000 award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to support the design, development and pilot of a web-based tool, the “New Play Exchange”.  Combining crowd-sourced recommendations, social media functions and a script database, the New Play Exchange will revolutionize the way playwrights and theaters connect in the nonprofit arena.  A consortium of six nonprofit organizations, led by NNPN, aim to launch the tool to the field in 2015.

“In a grant competition round which resulted in a record-breaking number of applications, the NNPN project distinguished itself as an innovative solution to an ongoing field challenge,” said Ben Cameron, Program Director for the Arts at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. “The New Play Exchange has enormous potential, not only for the members of the network but for the larger field as well, and we at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation are honored to support it.”

“The engine driving the success of the New Play Exchange is the active engagement of our five visionary partner organizations,” said Jason Loewith, NNPN’s Executive Director.  “We modeled the consortium on the Network’s core values:  a passion for new plays, a passion for collaboration, and a passion for playwrights.”  The partners are Chicago Dramatists, New Dramatists, the Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas, the Playwrights’ Center, and the Playwrights’ Foundation.

ABOUT THE NEW PLAY EXCHANGE

Drawing on NNPN’s history of crowd-sourced literary management leading to multiple productions, the New Play Exchange will combine a script database, crowd-sourced recommendations, and the interactivity of a social networking site to change the way literary departments and playwrights function field-wide.

Database.  The Exchange will have two portals – one for readers and one for playwrights – accessing the same central database.  Playwrights will create profile pages where they may upload scripts or synopses, provide sample pages, links to their own sites, reviews of their work, and other details.  Theaters, Literary Managers, and Dramaturgs will create reader profiles.  Uploaded scripts will be classified across a variety of rubrics such as genre, cast size, playwright identity or region, and keywords.   Theaters will be similarly classified, and the entire database will be easily searchable.

Crowd-Sourced Recommendations.  The power of the Exchange springs from crowd-sourcing script recommendations.  Users will receive play recommendations from readers, and those recommendations can be filtered according to who’s giving them.   For example, a user may create a “trusted readers” list of mission-aligned friends or mission-aligned theaters, and be immediately notified when one of those trusted readers has recommended a script… and of course, by clicking a button, that user can either obtain the script or contact information for the playwright.  By privileging recommendations (instead of ratings or reviews), the Exchange creates virtual networks of positivity surrounding plays and playwrights of promise.

Interactivity.  The Exchange will learn from systems like Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest about mechanisms that keep people engaged and involved.  For example, Facebook’s “news feed” may have a valuable analog in a feature that shows when new scripts have been uploaded by favorite playwrights or produced by favorite theaters.  The feed might notify users about new reviews of scripts they’ve tagged to follow, or other milestones like productions and awards.  Readers might be able to flag scripts, requesting a private “second opinion” from trusted friends.  Playwrights would similarly see notifications that their scripts have been recommended, or if another playwright has posted a script that matches some of their criteria.

DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE EXCHANGE

A Core Development Committee composed of consortium partner constituents will meet with playwrights, artistic directors, literary managers and dramaturgs in seven cities over the next eight months to gather feedback about evolving plans for the Exchange.  That Committee process will feed into web design, with deployment of the pilot site to consortium constituents through 2014.  NNPN hopes to open the New Play Exchange field-wide in 2015.

ABOUT THE DORIS DUKE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

The mission of the Doris duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people’s lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties.  Visit www.ddcf.org for more information.



Ten Ways to Advocate for Theatre Women

Recommendations by the League of Professional Theatre Women

Advocacy Committee, Deborah Savadge, Chair.

June 9, 2010. www.theatrewomen.org  

How can we, individually and collectively, use our personal and professional networks to advance the cause of visibility and opportunity for women in the theatre?     

  1. Talk about plays you’ve enjoyed that are by and about women. 
  2. Subscribe to a theatre company that produces work by women (such as the Women’s Project, Three Graces, and New Georges. Google to find others). 
  3. Use your theatre-going dollars to support women artists. Join the Meet-up Group Works-by-Women.  Join other women at the theatre on a group rate discount to see professional work by women writers, directors, and  designers. http://www.meetup.com/worksbywomen  (It’s free!) 
  4. Advocate for Blind Submissions of playwrights’ work.  Most major orchestras conduct blind auditions. Why not choose plays for prizes, grants, even productions, without regard to gender? Spread the word.
  5. If called upon to subscribe to a theatre ask, “How many women will be directing/designing/ writing/performing in plays for you this season?” Tell them you prefer to support theatres that are working toward gender parity. 
  6. Subscribe to New York Theatre Experience Guide to Plays by Women. (It’s free!) (http://www.nytheatre.com/nytheatre/bywomen.php) . Support its pledge to give parity to women in its coverage of theatre work.
  7. Join the DGA Women’s Initiative, New York Coalition of Professional Women in the Arts & Media, the League of Professional Theatre Women’s Advocacy Committee or 50/50 in 2020.       
  8. When you receive a brochure from a theatre company, count the women artists listed. Call the theatre to praise or critique them based on how close they are to parity.
  9. Talk about non-traditional casting (i.e., Judith Ivey as the Stage Manager in Our Town. Kathleen Chalfant as Mrs. Scrooge, Cate Blanchett as Hamlet, Fiona Shaw as Lear and Viola Davis as Gloucester). Talk, blog and use social networks to suggest plays you’d like to see in which a woman plays the lead, or in which women play the majority of the roles.
  10.  Amplify these actions by passing these tips to others.

Download the list Advocacy Committee – Ten Ways to Advocate for Theatre Women!