Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


Guest Tweeting for @LMDAmericas This Week

http://www.lmda.org/blog/194

Follow the session at @LMDAmericas!   #genderparity

Anne HamiltonAnne Hamilton is a NYC-based freelance dramaturg and the Founder of Hamilton Dramaturgy, an international consultancy. She holds an MFA from Columbia University School of the Arts, and has worked with Andrei Serban, Michael Mayer, Lynn Nottage, NYMF, Niegel Smith, and Classic Stage Company. She created Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow!, and her specialties include new play development, production dramaturgy, new musicals, career advising, advocacy, and oral histories. She was a Bogliasco Foundation Fellow. www.hamiltonlit.com

Questions from LMDA

What is your “focus” for the week?

During the week of March 2-8, 2015, I will tweet about several of the projects I am currently working on, as well as the recent triumphs of the playwrights for whom I have dramaturged. I think it is important to communicate the range of projects and locations that my freelance dramaturg’s practice involves. My projects as a dramaturg this week will include: Volunteering for the musical THE CALICO BUFFALO by EJ Stapleton, Peter Stopschinski in the New York Musical Theatre Festivals Next Link Project (to be produced in NYC in July); Giving feedback to Anita Gonzalez and Richard Allen on their new musical LIVERPOOL TRADING, and leading a Question and Answer session for their reading in the 6th Potpourri World Women Works Series (March 8, 3pm, NYC); and consulting with a first-time screenwriter. I will also list several of the accomplishments and upcoming shows of my dramaturgy clients including: the upcoming NYC production of Jack Karp’s IRREVERSIBLE and Crystal Jackson’s SYNCHRONICITY; and the recent reading of Tom Cavanaugh’s ADAM & YOSHI (directed by Stebos) for Artistic Director Jim Simpson at the Flea Theatre in NYC. Also, for my own development as an emerging playwright, I will be completing tasks for my drama THE SHOEBOX, which is a semi-finalist in Little Black Dress INK’s ONSTAGE PROJECT; and preparing a script for publication in England. Finally, I am waiting to hear some news this week on a couple of matters, so I’m hoping there will be some surprise announcements.

What is your definition of dramaturgy?

I describe myself as a literary and historical advisor to playwrights, directors, producers, and theatre companies.
What is your favorite or dream project?

My favorite project is the one I am working on in the moment. I enjoy a range of activities, from script development, to production dramaturgy, to developing new musicals, to research, to hosting TheatreNow!, to advising young artists on developing their careers. I enjoy learning and taking advantage of new technologies to help broaden the definition and practice of the profession.

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Hamilton Dramaturgy Intensive in NYC October 19-20

(Please note: The intensive has been postponed. If you would like to be placed on our mailing list, please send an email to hamiltondramaturgyintensive@gmail.com)

 DRAMATURGY INTENSIVE – AN INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

AUTHORS: WALTER BYONGSOK CHON AND ANNE HAMILTON

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADS, GRADUATE STUDENTS, AND THEATRE PROFESSIONALS

Saturday, October 19, 9am-5pm

Sunday, October 20, 10am – 5pm

a Studio in New York City, Location TBA

Features: 10 hours of instruction and exercises, discussion of 2 essays and 5 plays, and a maximum of 15 participants.

Cost: $350. Contact: Anne Hamilton at hamiltondramaturgyintensive@gmail.com

Register: Hamilton Dramaturgy Intensive Flier – October 19-20, 2013

Dramaturgy is a creative practice that, through critical thinking, enhances the breadth and depth of artistic imagination.  Dramaturgy is an integral process to the origination, development, production, and reception of plays and theatrical performances.”  – Walter Byongsok Chon

This workshop is designed to familiarize the participants with the term “dramaturgy,” to enhance their understanding and appreciation of dramaturgy as a practice and a profession, and to provide them with the essential tools to practice dramaturgy.   We will examine dramaturgy in its various functions and explore the role of the dramaturg in relation to the play text, the playwright, the artistic team, the theatre, the audience, and the community as a whole, both professional and public.  Through extended discussions and practical exercises, this workshop will help develop an understanding of dramaturgy as a process integral to the creation, development, production, and reception of plays and theatrical performances.

Syllabus: Introduction to Dramaturgy; How to Read a Play: Reading with a Dramaturgical Sensibility; Dramaturgy Practicum and Case Studies – Overview; Case Study I and II; Dramaturgy Practicum III and IV; Daring Dramaturgies in Practice and New Voices in American Theatre; Resources for Dramaturgs and Playwrights.

Anne Hamilton is the Founder of Hamilton Dramaturgy, an international consultancy based in New York City’s professional scene. With 22 years of experience, her clients have gone on to win the Pulitzer Prize, the MacArthur “Genius” Award, the Tony  Award, and a Royal Court International Residency. STAGE DIRECTIONS magazine named her a “trailblazer” in American dramaturgy. She holds an MFA in theatre criticism and dramaturgy from Columbia University of the Arts, and was a Bogliasco Foundation Fellow. She hosts and produces TheatreNow!, an oral history podcast series on female theatre artists.

Walter Byongsok Chon is a doctor of fine arts candidate at the Yale School of Drama, where he has served as a Dramaturg and the Artistic Coordinator at the Yale Repertory Theatre as well as several YSD and Yale Cabaret productions. He has developed new plays at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center and The Great Plains Theater Conference. His other specialties include translation (Serpent At My Thigh, Inching Towards Yeolha, from Korean into English; Charles Mee’s True Love from English to Korean), conference presentations (ATHE, PTRS), and publications of his articles in Praxis, Theater, The Korean National Theatre Magazine, and The Korean Theatre Review. Walter holds a BA in English from Sungkyunkwan University, an MA in theatre studies from Washington University in St. Louis, and an MFA from the Yale School of Drama. He is an Associate Dramaturg at Hamilton Dramaturgy.

Many thanks to Dr. Cindy Melby Phaneuf, who commissioned Walter Byongsok Chon to create this Dramaturgy Intensive for its first presentation at the University of Nebraska Omaha in May, 2013.

Please send an email, and we will send more information.

Payment: $100 is due to register. The remaining $250 must be paid by October 11th, 2013, or the deposit will be forfeited

Payment must be made by PayPal. We will send PayPal invoices by email.

  • The Dramaturgy Intensive is available for two-day workshops at colleges and universities. Please send an inquiry.
  • If you are located somewhere else in the world and are interested in the Intensive, please send an email indicating your interest and we will attempt to create an online program.
  • We are able to present the Dramaturgy Intensive in additional American cities.

Download the Registration form here: Hamilton Dramaturgy Intensive Flier – October 19-20, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL THIS REGISTRATION FORM TO hamiltondramaturgyintensive@gmail.com

and you will receive an invoice by email.

@AnneHamiltonlit       #hamiltondramaturgyintensive



Anne Hamilton Joins America-in-Play Staff

America-In-Play

America-In-Play has expanded and reconfigured its artistic staff and happily welcomes two dramaturgs to our team. Joining as Senior Dramaturg is Anne Hamilton, a New York City-based freelance dramaturg and the Founder of Hamilton Dramaturgy. STAGE DIRECTIONS magazine named her a “trailblazer” in American dramaturgy, and AMERICAN THEATRE profiled her TheatreNow! podcast series.

Anne has worked with Andrei Serban, the Joseph Papp Public Theater, the Harold Prince Musical Theatre Institute, Michael Mayer, Lynn Nottage, Yehuda Ne’eman, Classic Stage Company, B.T. McNicholl, Tina Andrews, NYSCA, Jean Cocteau Repertory Theater, Leslie Lee, Andrew Barrett, Warren Bodow, Tom Cavanaugh, The New York City Public Library’s Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the University of Iowa Playwrights Workshop. She produces and hosts Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow!, which features some of the most important contemporary female theatre artists working in America. She holds an MFA in theatre criticism and dramaturgy from Columbia University.

Ms. Hamilton will work closely with Artistic Director Lynn Thomson and Associate Artistic Director Dominic Taylor and will be production dramaturg for next May’s presentation of A Time Traveler’s Trip to Niagara Falls.

AIP also welcomes Andy Buck as Dramaturg. Mr. Buck worked with AIP this past year, including serving as production dramaturg on Exodus Code, Advice for Wanderers. He has been an editor and writer for such publications as PLAYBI LL, STAGEBILL and IN THEATER.

Elizabeth Bojsza, who has served as staff dramaturg for two years, is now Lead Dramaturg for The Recovery Project and was this season recipient of a grant from Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of America to help launch this initiative.

This expansion reflects the achievements of the company’s last season and speaks also to our ambitious coming year to include a new cohort of theatre artists for a three year residency. The ongoing efforts of The Recovery Project will culminate in readings of reconstructed lost plays and a full production of our newest devised play at The Hudson Guild Theatre In May 2014. For more information please visit our website at americainplay.org.



Magda Romanska’s Dramaturgy Handbook

Great news! Magda Romanska has allowed LMDA to post her Dramaturgy Handbook . What a terrific resource! Enjoy!

Download it here: Madga Romanska’s Dramaturgy Handbook for Emerson

Dr. Romanska is Associate Professor of Theatre and Dramaturgy at Emerson College in Boston, MA, and Research Associate at Harvard University’s Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. She is a recipient of the Aquila Polonica Article Prize and the Gerald Kahan Scholar’s Prize. A former exchange scholar at the Yale School of Drama and fellow at the Mellon School of Theatre and Performance Research at Harvard University, Romanska graduated with honors from Stanford and holds a Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Here is the link: http://www.lmda.org/magda-romanskas-dramaturgy-handbook-emerson-college



Blogger Posts on Playwrighting Success Stories

Playwright and  Journalist Donna Hoke is offering a terrific series featuring interviews with literary managers from all over the country. She calls it the Real Inspiration for Playwrights Project (RIPP).  Brava, Donna!

You can find it at: http://blog.donnahoke.com/category/ripp/

Excerpt: “Playwrights talk a lot about how to get plays in the hands of those who will read them, and lamenting the seeming impossibility of this task. And yet… if it were truly impossible, would we keep writing? Would we keep submitting day in and day out? We must believe that even if the odds are slim, there are indeed odds. Odds that are not insurmountable. Odds that lead to success stories.  So I went looking for them. More than that, I found them…”



Beth Blickers on When to Approach an Agent

Beth gave some great advice on the LMDA listserv today and I just had to repost it. Thank you so much, Beth!

“If you’ve only written one play and it hasn’t been produced then it is decidedly too soon to look for an agent. And bear in mind that once an agent passes on repping you, you go into their database of people to whom they have said no. And I know for a fact that at some agencies that database is shared within the department. Meaning if you get told no by one agent and approach a different agent two years later, they look you up and you can wind up getting passed on again without being read afresh.

The strongest moment to reach out to agents is when something nationally recognized is happening in your career, when you’ve built of fan base of people who know agents and can speak highly of you and when you are starting to bring in some income so they aren’t working entirely for free. At this point you’ll probably have met some agents in passing at theaters and panels, you’ll probably have worked with some directors who have agents (and are easy ways to get introductions), you’ll have artistic directors and literary managers who will make introductions on your behalf. And I hope you will have talked to represented artists about who they are with, who they know, who they like and why they like them, what agents are actually able to do for them, how they work well together (or don’t), so that you can thoughtfully talk with some agents and make a choice and work together happily for many decades to come.

Don’t (and I’m sure every literary manager will second this list) send us a play you have never heard out loud, even if it’s just in your living room. Don’t tell me about the 22 full length plays, 78 one acts and 592 sonnets you’ve written. Don’t list all of the famous people you know if they’ve never done a thing to further your career. Don’t tell me you’ve been produced by a theater when it was a one night event. Be honest and straightforward. I’d rather a fairly empty resume with a genius cover note then a dazzling array of information that when I start to pick at it, falls apart like dust. And trust me, we check. If you tell me a theater is strongly considering your play I WILL ask that theater about it. And 99 times out of 100 the “strong consideration” means the writer sent them the play that week. Makes the writer look bad to me and the theater.

Do network like mad, go to new play festivals, offer people a mid afternoon iced latte in exchange for an informational meeting, Google theaters, have a website, befriend writers and directors, invest energies in things other than theater, be interested in the world around you and be an interesting person yourself. Know what makes you unique and what you have to offer to the world of theater. The other day I chastised theaters who respond to queries about what they are looking for in a play with “good writing.” I’d say the same to any artist. If I ask you want you want to do in the theater please don’t tell me “write good plays and work with good people.” It tells me nothing about what makes YOU special. And if you don’t know what makes you special why do I care? To quote the great Liz Engleman “why this play, now.” I’d expand that and say agents are asking daily “why this writer, now.” The best writers have an answer. And my goodness they are a delight to represent.”

Beth Blickers is currently an agent at Abrams Artists Agency, where she represents such writers, composers, directors and choreographers for theatre, television and film. Before joining Abrams, she was an agent at Helen Merrill Ltd. and the William Morris Agency, where she began work after graduating from New York University.



NNPN Receives Grant

Here is news that will change the way dramaturgs and literary managers function within the next five years.

NNPN Receives Cornerstone Funding for Web-based “New Play Exchange”: $110K Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

WASHINGTON, DC – The NATIONAL NEW PLAY NETWORK (NNPN), the country’s alliance of non-profit theaters that champions the development, production, and continued life of new plays, proudly announces a two-year $110,000 award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to support the design, development and pilot of a web-based tool, the “New Play Exchange”.  Combining crowd-sourced recommendations, social media functions and a script database, the New Play Exchange will revolutionize the way playwrights and theaters connect in the nonprofit arena.  A consortium of six nonprofit organizations, led by NNPN, aim to launch the tool to the field in 2015.

“In a grant competition round which resulted in a record-breaking number of applications, the NNPN project distinguished itself as an innovative solution to an ongoing field challenge,” said Ben Cameron, Program Director for the Arts at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. “The New Play Exchange has enormous potential, not only for the members of the network but for the larger field as well, and we at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation are honored to support it.”

“The engine driving the success of the New Play Exchange is the active engagement of our five visionary partner organizations,” said Jason Loewith, NNPN’s Executive Director.  “We modeled the consortium on the Network’s core values:  a passion for new plays, a passion for collaboration, and a passion for playwrights.”  The partners are Chicago Dramatists, New Dramatists, the Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of the Americas, the Playwrights’ Center, and the Playwrights’ Foundation.

ABOUT THE NEW PLAY EXCHANGE

Drawing on NNPN’s history of crowd-sourced literary management leading to multiple productions, the New Play Exchange will combine a script database, crowd-sourced recommendations, and the interactivity of a social networking site to change the way literary departments and playwrights function field-wide.

Database.  The Exchange will have two portals – one for readers and one for playwrights – accessing the same central database.  Playwrights will create profile pages where they may upload scripts or synopses, provide sample pages, links to their own sites, reviews of their work, and other details.  Theaters, Literary Managers, and Dramaturgs will create reader profiles.  Uploaded scripts will be classified across a variety of rubrics such as genre, cast size, playwright identity or region, and keywords.   Theaters will be similarly classified, and the entire database will be easily searchable.

Crowd-Sourced Recommendations.  The power of the Exchange springs from crowd-sourcing script recommendations.  Users will receive play recommendations from readers, and those recommendations can be filtered according to who’s giving them.   For example, a user may create a “trusted readers” list of mission-aligned friends or mission-aligned theaters, and be immediately notified when one of those trusted readers has recommended a script… and of course, by clicking a button, that user can either obtain the script or contact information for the playwright.  By privileging recommendations (instead of ratings or reviews), the Exchange creates virtual networks of positivity surrounding plays and playwrights of promise.

Interactivity.  The Exchange will learn from systems like Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest about mechanisms that keep people engaged and involved.  For example, Facebook’s “news feed” may have a valuable analog in a feature that shows when new scripts have been uploaded by favorite playwrights or produced by favorite theaters.  The feed might notify users about new reviews of scripts they’ve tagged to follow, or other milestones like productions and awards.  Readers might be able to flag scripts, requesting a private “second opinion” from trusted friends.  Playwrights would similarly see notifications that their scripts have been recommended, or if another playwright has posted a script that matches some of their criteria.

DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE EXCHANGE

A Core Development Committee composed of consortium partner constituents will meet with playwrights, artistic directors, literary managers and dramaturgs in seven cities over the next eight months to gather feedback about evolving plans for the Exchange.  That Committee process will feed into web design, with deployment of the pilot site to consortium constituents through 2014.  NNPN hopes to open the New Play Exchange field-wide in 2015.

ABOUT THE DORIS DUKE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

The mission of the Doris duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people’s lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention of child abuse, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties.  Visit www.ddcf.org for more information.