Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


SPARKS in NYC

THE NARRATING SCENE. READINGS FROM ITALIAN STORYTELLING THEATER

 SCINTILLE / SPARKS by Laura Sicignano

Author reading & discussion “Meet the Author” / Lettura e discussione con l’autrice

Date: Thursday, September 19, 2013 / Hours: 6:00 pm / Venue: Italian Cultural Institute of New York / Organized by: ICI

In collaboration with: Regione Liguria and Comune di Genova

RSVP / prenota http://www.iicnewyork.esteri.it/IIC_NewYork/webform/SchedaEvento.aspx?id=679&citta=NewYork

SCINTILLE / SPARKS a play by Laura Sicignano, translation by Maggie Rose, with thanks to Anna Jardine

New York, 25 March 1911, 4.40 pm: in fifteen minutes workers at the T.S.C.  (Triangle Shirtwaist Company) , a blouse  factory, will be finishing their shift. There are almost six hundred people, mostly young women immigrants from Italy and Eastern Europe, many Jewish girls, all exploited and underpaid.

A spark, just one spark and suddenly the factory skyscraper  is up in flames. In the building there is no fire alarm.  Since all doors are locked and the goods lift has broken down due to overweight, there is little chance of escape.

In 18 minutes 146 people died, mostly young women.

The T.S.C. owners were let off, even if they had failed to respect basic security measures.

The episode became one of the historical events related to International Women’s Day.

Many other stories are connected with the March 8th celebrations, but there is no other event in women’s history that so significantly underlines this turning point.

At the same time the story is hardly remembered.

SCINTILLE \SPARKS is about current, important issues: health and safety measures at work,  discrimination of migrants in the USA, the first examples of Trade Union Organizations, the memory of women who made History , the hopes of migrants from every age and from all over the world, women’s liberation.

A Note from Curator Dina Del Monte: In the narrative theatre, the fundamental point of stage language is the body and voice of the actor. Because of this, the performer is able to evoke visions that capture and involve the imagination of the spectator. Still little known outside the European context, the narrative theatre is one of the most interesting artistic movements and one of the most vital to world of contemporary Italian theatre. Because of this, the Italian Cultural Institute wishes to bring to New York a selection of works that will be shown in their original version with English subtitles. They are brought directly from their authors – who are often the main interpreters. The wealth and the cleanliness of the utilized language also make these three meetings a particularly interesting opportunity to practice and improve the awareness of our language.

Laura Sicignano Graduated in Theatre History at the University in Milano and is a freelance journalist for specialized magazines related to theatre. She collaborated with the Theatre Agency QP. She has been production’s assistant for Santagata and Morganti, Elio De Capitani Teatro dell’Elfo; Federico Tiezzi – Magazzini; Tonino Conte Teatro della Tosse. She has been working for many years at Teatro Stabile in Genova, in the areas of Marketing, Public Relations and Cultural Activities. She is one of the founders of TEATRO CARGO and at present she manages the company. She is a member of the Scientific Committee of the Museo Biblioteca dell’Attore. She collaborates with Editor Laterza for a series of conference related to the History of Genova.



EUROPA, OUR FIRST MIGRANT

EUROPA, OUR FIRST MIGRANT

Margaret Rose, an English playwright working in Italy, has been a guest columnist for ScriptForward!, sharing her expertise on the subject of international translation and collaboration. One of her new translations from Italian to English will premiere at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this month.

An Italian-Scottish collaboration, Europa, Our First Migrant is a brand new play, drawing on the Greek myth, ‘The Rape of Europa”.  Europa, daughter of the King of Phoenicia, is abducted by the god Zeus, disguised as a bull. Having settled on Crete, this young woman gives birth to three children, including the Minotaur, so engendering the first Europeans. Her brother Cadmus sets off to find her and circulates the alphabet in the new Continent.

The play rewrites the myth, exploring what it means to be European today in a continent which is fast changing. In an often surprising game between past and present, a modern-day Europa and Zeus undertake the journey of the mythical figures from Phoenicia (modern-day Lebanon) to Crete, ending up in Scotland. Here Europa discovers that her new country is very different from the Fantarcadia she had been dreaming of.

Europa our First Migrant (English adaptation by Maggie Rose) is based on an Italian play, Europa Migrante (by Salvatore Cabras). Directed by Joe Gallagher and produced by Glasgow’s Replico Company, the play will be performed at the Italian Cultural Institute, 82 Nicolson Street in Edinburgh on the 23rd and 24th of August at 5pm. It will then embark on a two week island and Highlands tour. The production is funded by Creative Scotland, with the support of the Italian Institute of Culture.



New Play Development in Italy

Margaret Rose was kind enough to serve as a guest columnist in the latest issue of ScriptForward!, where gives us insight into new play development in Italy.

Margaret is a Scottish national who works as a professor in Milan, and actively pursues her career as a playwright in the UK and on the continent.

You can download the article here: Margaret Rose’s Article on New Play Development in Italy – SF! #26

Excerpt:

When Anne Hamilton wrote to me, asking for a short piece dealing with “the new play development process in Italy”, I immediately translated the word ‘process’ into a very definite plural. While Italy this year is celebrating 150 years as a single nation state, in many fields any sense of unity is still tenuous. Theatre and contemporary playwriting are no exceptions to this rule.

Associations for the support and development of playwriting are fairly recent and and thin on the ground. Teatro delle Donne. Centro Nazionale di Drammaturgia (Women’s Theatre. National Centre of Playwriting), founded in Florence in 1991, includes an archive for plays written by women (today numbering nearly 1,000). It also runs a cutting- edge theatre season at the Teatro Comunale Manzoni in Calenzano and in 2004 writer Dacia Maraini set up a National School of Playwriting at the theatre…



ScriptForward! #26

Greetings!

Welcome to the May issue of ScriptForward!, a specialty E-newsletter prepared for professional and aspiring scriptwriters by Hamilton Dramaturgy. With over twenty years of experience in New York, across the nation, and internationally, I offer this newsletter as a means of support and information to the worldwide scriptwriting community.

This month’s guest columnist is Margaret Rose, who shares her experience regarding new play development in Italy.

We also introduce you to 17%, a new organization formed to support and promote female playwrights in the UK.

Please look over the “Recent Successes” section to see all the exciting events which are taking place, especially my direction of a reading of THE STACY PLAY in New York City’s Central Park this month. We also have a great quote of the month from Jennifer Tipton.

And the Burning [An]swer section features advice on how to decide between a stage play and a screenplay when writing about a celebrity.

I hope that this issue of ScriptForward! will be useful to you and I welcome your feedback.

-Anne Hamilton

Read the issue here: Hamilton Dramaturgy’s ScriptForward! #26