Anne Hamilton/Hamilton Dramaturgy


BCWJ Profile of Genne Murphy

Here is my latest Bucks County Womens Journal article. Download it Anne Hamilton’s BCWJ Profile of Genne Murphy.

Profile of Genne Murphy

By Anne M. Hamilton, MFA

Genne Murphy is a rising star in the theatre world. Her plays have been developed or produced in Nebraska, Colorado, New York and Connecticut as well as locally. The Azuka Theatre produced HOPE STREET AND OTHER LONELY PLACES.

Recently, she was honored with the Leah Ryan Fund for Emerging Women Writer’s Award for her play GIANTESS at the Lilly Awards, hosted at the Signature Theater in New York City. The Lilly Awards celebrate significant contributions by women to the American theatre, including 2016 honorees Danai Gurira, Jesse Mueller and Martha Plimpton.

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Murphy has been deeply involved as a writer and arts educator since graduating from Central High. Her many local awards and affiliations include the Philadelphia Young Playwrights, PlayPenn, and the Leeway Foundation Transformation Award/Art and Change Grant.

Originally, she says, the idea for GIANTESS came in a dream: “I was trying to pour water into a tiny glass and it was really annoying. Then all of a sudden I realized, ‘OMG I’m a giant!’ I panicked, woke up. [The dream] really stuck with me–that idea of being so discombobulated and feeling extremely uncomfortable in your body. I thought there were a lot of interesting metaphors to explore.”

Described by the Leah Ryan FEWW program as having, “truly singular and theatrical voice,” Murphy will workshop her play with a few closed-door readings at Primary Stages in New York City and New York Stage and Film before the Fund presents a full public reading in the fall.

“GIANTESS starts with a young woman who is taking care of her ailing, disabled grandmother,” says Murphy. “Early on in the play she discovers a girl her own age in the abandoned factory behind her grandmother’s house – a 30-foot tall giantess. They develop a deepening connection to one another in this very fraught and heightened situation.”

Reflecting on her time with Philadelphia Young Playwrights, she states, “My experience, [as] a student, educator, and staff member enabled the idea of revision – the actual work of revision – to be a less scary prospect.”

She holds a bachelor’s degree from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and is currently an M.F.A. candidate in playwriting at the Yale School of Drama.

Anne Hamilton has 25 years of experience as a dramaturg. She is available for script consultations and career advising through hamiltonlit@hotmail.com.

 



BCWJ Article on Little Black Dress INK

Outside the Lines_UNBOUND posterLittle Black Dress INK

By Anne M. Hamilton, MFA

For the past year I have had the pleasure of being involved in Little Black Dress INK’s Female Playwrights Onstage Project.

Now in its fourth year, the competition is the brainchild of Playwright and Educator Tiffany Antone, who currently resides in Texas. This national festival of new work has a different theme each year and utilizes a peer review process to identify semi-finalists, whose short plays or monologues are then read in different cities across the country. Finalists are chosen from those events. They enjoyed a staged reading at the Los Angeles Theatre Center last year, followed by a production in Arizona in January.

In 2014, the theme was Planting the Seed, and my play OFEM, inspired by my experience as a CSA member at Blooming Glen Farm, was a finalist. It was read in Ithaca, NY, and Los Angeles before being given its premiere in Arizona. Indie Theatre Now will publish OFEM and all the finalists in an online volume of 11 plays.

This year’s theme is Outside the Lines, and my two character drama THE SHOEBOX is a semifinalist. This short play reunites two high school classmates to reminisce in a late night phone call after their homeroom teacher, a nun, has passed away. Theater Unbound in Minneapolis gave it a staged reading along with five other pieces in March. The festival is still unfolding in events across the country.

Tiffany summarizes her goals on her website: “Little Black Dress INK is an experiment in support, inspired by recent revelations in numbers on the subject of just how few female playwrights actually get produced. Through outreach, education, and producing opportunities, Little Black Dress INK strives to create more production opportunities for female playwrights while also strengthening the female playwright network.”

I have found this competition to be a highly effective and rewarding way of reaching those goals. It grows every year, and currently involves 35 new plays and over 60 artists in eight cities. 2016 submission guidelines will be posted on www.littleblackdressink.org on October 1, 2015.

Anne Hamilton has 24 years of experience as a dramaturg. She is available for script consultations and career advising through hamiltonlit@hotmail.com. Her play WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? was performed at The Lost Theatre in London in October, 2014. She will teach a playwriting workshop at the Philadelphia Writers Conference in June 12-14, 2015.

To be published in Anne’s Page & Stage column in the Bucks County Women’s Journal (April/May 2015 issue). www.buckscountywomensjournal.com



WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? on youtube

WATCH HERE – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVUzz0EJq5E

It’s up!  A video of the production of my short play WHO’S ANDY WARHOL?, which was performed at the Lost Theatre in Wandsworth, London on October 24th. This is one of the 10 winning plays from the British Theatre Challenge. the International New Writing Competition by the Sky Blue Theatre Company of Cambridge, England.

WHO’S ANDY WARHOL? portrays a medical crisis which redefines the relationship between two lovers when one contracts transient global amnesia.

I am very happy with the production, especially the actors Chris Towner-Jones as Matt, and Lizzie Stanton as Sarah. What a joy it is to watch my words come to life! I hope that you enjoy this piece produced by Mini Mammoth Films. This is the first of the winning plays to be posted on youtube.

Special thanks to Anne Bartram of Sky Blue, and Rah Petherbridge, the UK-based photographer who took these wonderful stills below.

If you would like to read the play, please contact me at hamiltonlit@hotmail.com. Thank you for watching!

 

©Rah Petherbridge -  Who's Andy Warhol--3

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TheatreNow! Interview with Murielle Borst Tarrant

Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! is a podcast series featuring some of the most exciting women artists working in the theatre today. Anne Hamilton is the producer and host. You may listen to the podcasts and read the transcripts at http://hamiltondramaturgystheatrenow.com

 Murielle Borst Tarrant

Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow!

Interview with Murielle Borst Tarrant

Playwright, Director and Producer

(Season 3, Episode 5, Recorded July 12, 2012)

Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! Interview with Murielle Borst Tarrant

 Anne Hamilton: Welcome to Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! This is a podcast series featuring some of the most exciting female artists working in the theatre today. I’m your host, Anne Hamilton. Today our guest is Murielle Borst Tarrant.

Murielle is a member of the Kuna and Rappahannock Nations. She is an author, playwright, director, producer, cultural artist, educator, and human rights activist. She comes from a long line of cultural activism with her family’s theater company, the world famous Spiderwoman Theater, located in New York City. For four years she served as the Special Assistant and liaison to Tonya Gonnella Frichner, the North American Regional representative to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Finally, she is the director of “Safe Harbors” Indigenous Arts/Theatre Collective at La Mama ETC.

Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the purposes of Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! must be made payable to Fractured Atlas and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.

 



Kia Corthron’s Great Plains Theatre Conference Speech

Playwright Kia Corthron gave a terrific speech as the Honored Playwright at the 2014 Great Plains Theatre Conference. We are privileged to post it here. It is a must-read! Thank you so much, Kia.

Download it here: Kia Corthron’s 2014 Great Plains Theatre Conference Speech

GPTC 2014 Honored Playwright Kia Corthron

GPTC 2014 Honored Playwright Kia Corthron

Kia Corthron was awarded a 2014 Windham Campbell Literature Prize. She is a contributing writer of Steel Hammer performed by Anne Bogart’s SITI Company, developed through ATL/Humana 2014 and premiering at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2015. Corthron’s Life by Asphyxiation, previously produced by Playwrights Horizons, inaugurated the Public Theater’s Public Forum Drama Club last October.

Other plays include A Cool Dip in the Barren Saharan Crick (Playwrights Horizons coproduction with The Play Company and the Culture Project), Trickle (Ensemble Studio Theatre’s Marathon), Moot the Messenger (Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Humana Festival), Light Raise the Roof (New York Theatre Workshop), Snapshot Silhouette (Minneapolis’ Children’s Theatre), Slide Glide the Slippery Slope (ATL Humana, Mark Taper Forum), The Venus de Milo Is Armed (Alabama Shakespeare Festival), Breath, Boom (London’s Royal Court Theatre, Playwrights Horizons, Yale Repertory Theatre, Huntington Theatre and elsewhere), Force Continuum (Atlantic Theater Company), Splash Hatch on the E Going Down (New York Stage and Film, Baltimore’s Center Stage, Yale Rep, London’s Donmar Warehouse), Seeking the Genesis (Goodman Theatre, Manhattan Theatre Club), Digging Eleven (Hartford Stage Company), Wake Up Lou Riser (Delaware Theatre Company), Come Down Burning (American Place Theatre, Long Wharf Theatre), Cage Rhythm (Sightlines/The Point in the Bronx).

Awards and fellowships include the 2012 Lee Reynolds Award (League of Professional Theatre Women), Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Creative Arts Residency (Italy), Dora Maar Residency (France), MacDowell Colony, Siena Arts Institute Visiting Artist (Italy), Playwrights Center’s McKnight National Residency, Masterwork Productions Award, the Wachtmeister Award, Columbia College/Goodman Theatre Fellowship, Barbara Barondess MacLean Foundation Award, AT&T On Stage Award, Daryl Roth Creative Spirit Award, Mark Taper Forum’s Fadiman Award, National Endowment for the Arts/TCG, Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays, New Professional Theatre Playwriting Award, Callaway Award, and in television a Writers Guild Outstanding Drama Series Award and Edgar Allan Poe Award for The Wire.

Most recently Kia has written two new plays, Megastasis and Slingshot, and a novel. She currently serves on the Council of the Dramatists Guild, is a member of the Writers Guild of America, and is an alumnus of New Dramatists.



Anne Hamilton’s Article on 21st Century Freelance Dramaturgy in new international textbook

I am thrilled to announce the publication of my article, “Freelance dramaturgs in the twenty-first century: journalists, advocates, and curators” in the ROUTLEDGE COMPANION TO DRAMATURGY (ISBN: 978-0-415-65849-2,published on July 29, 2014), edited by  Magda Romanska. My chapter is the only one on freelance dramaturgy in the book.

The article details the creation and development of Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow!, as well as other tools I have used to utilize technology, cultural interconnectedness, and entrepreneurship to expand the role of the dramaturg in the 21st century.

It appears as the 18th chapter of the book, in the Age of Globalization section. TheatreNow’s Asia Representative Walter Byongsok Chon also contributed a chapter in the same section, entitled, “Intercultural dramaturgy: dramaturg as cultural liaison”.

The volume is available at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415658492/?utm_source=cms&utm_medium=url&utm_campaign=SBU4_SJC_3RF_8cm_9PER_00000_HBK

THE ROUTLEDGE COMPANION TO DRAMATURGY Edited by Magda Romanska

 

 

 

 

 



Time to See Donkey Punch

I LOVE Soho Rep!

Works by Women

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Tonight, Micheline Auger‘s Donkey Punchmakes the rare leap from indie, Off-Off Broadway theater to Off-Broadway theater. Previews begin at Soho Playhouse, the venerable space that launched many playwrights careers (think Albee, Shepard). In this instance, Ivy Theatre, a company dedicated to untold stories and unheard voices, remounts its production of Auger’s audacious, moving play.

Written and directed by women (Auger and director Audrey Alford), Donkey Punch (the piece was formerly known as The Feminism of a Soft Merlot or How the Donkey Got Punched) explores feminism and women’s sexuality with the deftness of French filmmaker Catherine Breillat mixed with a true American sentiment. The play follows two friends at a crossroads in each’s life.

From the press release: In Donkey Punch, uninhibited Kareena delves into monogamy while her uptight best friend, Sam, starts dating a pornographer. In this fast-paced world of sex, shifting relationships…

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OFEM by Anne Hamilton to Be Read in Ithaca May 4th

Little Black Dress Ink' new play festival takes place this spring across the country.

I am very pleased that my short play OFEM has been chosen as a semi-finalist for Little Black Dress Ink’s 2014 Female Playwrights Onstage Project. It will be featured in an Ithaca, NY reading on May 4th. If chosen as a finalist, it will have a reading at the Center Theater Group in Los Angeles later this year.

Here is a guest post I wrote for Little Black Dress Ink’s website. It gives a little bit of background on how I was inspired to write OFEM.

OFEM – A Comic Monologue on American Food Attitudes

I have been eating organic food for about fifteen years. I needed to regain some health after the exhaustion I felt after graduating from Columbia University and starting my career as a dramaturg in New York City. I started ordering deliveries from Urban Organics, based in Brooklyn, after a recommendation from Lynn Nottage.

In 2004, I moved to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, a beautiful region filled with farms and natural reserves. I was lucky enough to get in on the ground floor of a Community Supported Agriculture project at Blooming Glen Farm. As a CSA member, I often visited the farm to help with chores, like replanting onions, helping to hang garlic in the barn, and at the end of the season, to pull up tomato vines from the fields so the farmers could prepare the soil for the next season’s planting.

While on the farm, and also while hanging out with health-conscious new friends, I noticed that there is a particularly ferocious atmosphere in Bucks County with regards to food. Some are outright food preachers, espousing one type of diet over another, and some are more low-key but equally obvious about showing their attitudes, usually with a gesture of rolling eyes, or a sharp intake of breath when an opinion is mentioned that they don’t agree with. I’ve never been in a place where food attitudes were so important socially.

One day I was considering this fact, and I started thinking about writing a monologue that would push the envelope on dramatizing the food attitudes of urban and rural Americans.

As a serious example of such dramatization, I remembered an excellent monologue named A CHIP ON MY SHOULDER by Carol K. Mack, which appeared in the League of Professional Women’s New Play Festival in 2009 at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City. In it, a woman named Annie, played by Kathryn A. Layng, gives a speech at a podium thanking Monsanto for its strides in food manipulation and production. She refers to an implanted electronic chip which the company has offered, and is now becoming a normal part of American life. It was a truly intelligent and chilling piece.

With admiration for Carol’s satire, I was inspired to move in the other direction, and my mind took a wildly comic turn. What if a group of female farmers, due to their feminist leanings, decided only grow to food that is round, or round-ish? What if they went further and banished phallic-shaped objects from their diets? What would cause them to do such a thing? And what if we visited them on the day that this new food movement was rolled out to the public?

And so, OFEM, or, the Ovo-Farmer’s Emerging Network was conceived.

Its leader, Sally Parsons, is giving a speech to launch the network, and stands at the podium in iconic magnificence, like Rosie the Riveter and Emma Goldman combined. Her speech has the passion of an early 20th—century union organizing appeal. As she rails against the “Farmer Man”, she goes over the top with a litany of vegetables and fruits which will and will not be grown by OFEM. And at the end, like a suffragette leading the charge to new freedoms and rights, she invites her listeners to participate in the movement and usher in a new era for humanity.

Sally is over the top, and obviously, her message is larger than life, but it makes a point about attitudes toward food consumption, both slightly mocking, and also, deeply respectful, because it points to the power – the anarchism, one could say – of influencing society’s attitudes by taking independent control of food production. I love her enthusiasm. Isn’t it anarchic to make a stand against oppressive food attitudes? And also against mainstream food growth systems, whether they’re corporations, or family businesses?

OFEM expresses what I consider a lot of time to be the silliness and offensiveness exhibited by privileged, wealthy foodies. I want to say to them, “Come on, people, it’s food. It’s nutrition. Be thankful for the hard work of the people who labor to bring it to you.”

At the same time, I respect their choices. Food consumption involves personal, ethical, financial and sometimes medical choices that I might not be aware of.  So in the end, who am I to judge?

I hope that everyone will enjoy Sally’s speech. Who knows? Maybe I’ve created a viable movement! Power to the farmer!

 

 

 



BEHOLD by Tom Cavanaugh Returns to Los Angeles

I hope that you will all join me in Los Angeles on Monday night, March 10th for a reading of BEHOLD, which I have helped Tom Cavanaugh develop over the years. It is a daring and timely play which I am very proud of.

The award-winning stage play returns to Los Angeles with a special workshop production by The Blank Theatre Company, as part of its Living Room Series.

Tom Cavanaugh

The Blank Theatre of Hollywood as part of their Living Room Series presents a workshop production of BEHOLD a new play by Tom Cavanaugh, on Monday March 10th, at 8pm, at Second Stage Theatre. Cast for this workshop production includes David Marciano (Virgil of HOMELAND), Kerris Dorsey (Bridget of RAY DONOVAN), Blaire Chandler, David Hemphill and John Ross Clark, Directed by Christopher J. Raymond and Written by Tom Cavanaugh.

BEHOLD is about a suburban family which loses a son to a Columbine-type shooting at the local high school and how the family changes while dealing with the tragic loss. While the mother descends into depression, and the daughter into violence, the father rips down a cross representing the shooter from a hillside memorial. The central, timely question here is, “Was the shooter a victim of violence, too?”

Rather than playing a blame game, or making a political statement, BEHOLD shows the severe reactions to the loss of a son and a brother from within the family home. Only Bobby, the surviving brother, receives what he feels is a message from above, bringing compassion for the whole series of events. An extended fugue of internal monologues surrounding the father’s iconic destruction of the shooter’s cross memorial opens the second act. “Not only does the play pack a sucker punch along the lines of The Normal Heart and Death of a Salesman,” says artistic director, AJ Ciccotelli of the La Strada Theatre in New Jersey, “The play reveals the destructive force of violence in the home when the unthinkable becomes a reality.”

BEHOLD was one of three plays awarded the 2011 Pickering Award for Excellence in Playwriting and received a workshop production at the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

A twenty-two year veteran 911 operator & police dispatcher, Cavanaugh used his own experience with the murder of his grandfather, who was beaten to death in his home by three teenage boys, and manifested his responses and sentiments during that experience into the lives of the characters.

Cavanaugh, who is a graduate of the MFA program in playwriting at the Actors Studio Drama School in New York City, used his powers of healing insight when he bought a hundred cups of coffee for the people of Newtown, CT in the wake of the Sandy Hook School Shooting. “I wanted to restore some normality in the lives of the people of Newtown,” when asked by a national reporter on his motives. Tom went on to explain, “After the last camera crew leaves, the real grief begins. Hopefully this act is only the beginning to help the people of that town.”

Cavanaugh’s act of kindness caused a media sensation that brought direct donations to the people of Newtown, CT from as far as South Africa and Great Britain. Inspired by Cavanaugh’s actions, people picked up their phones and purchased goods and services from Newtown stores that were given for free with the purpose of directly helping the people of Newtown CT.

The staged reading of BEHOLD will be presented on Monday, March 10th, at 8:00pm, as part of The Blank Theatre’s Living Room Series at:
2nd Stage Theatre
6500 Santa Monica Blvd. (at Wilcox)
Hollywood CA 90038

For reservations please e-mail info(at)theblank(dot)com
Suggested Donations Start at $10.



TheatreNow! Expands in 2013

2013 was a year in which I worked on building TheatreNow!’s platform.

We have expanded internationally as well as in the U.S., and now have Representatives for many areas:

US Representative: Cate Cammarata
Asia Representative: Walter Byongsok Chon
UK Representative: Natalie Pandya
South America Representative: Thais Flaitt
Young Audience Development Representative: Danica Rodriguez

In April, Natalie, a recent Oxford University graduate (St. Catherine’s College), corresponded with leading UK universities and conservatories about the podcast, laying the groundwork for greater dissemination there. Natalie now works for the BBC.

During the summer, Danica, a rising senior at the prestigious Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School in Manhattan, created a proposal for introducing the podcast to young adults and theatre aficionados.

In December, I invited Thais Flaitt, a recent M.A. graduate of the University of Nebraska Omaha, to serve as our South America representative. A native of Brazil, Thais is a skilled scholar, director, and translator.

Several hundred people have listened to the audio postings on the Soundcloud site. In addition, the TheatreNow! blog (http://theatrenow.wordpress.com) drew visitors from 57 countries, and the top podcasts viewed were with Paule Constable and Jennifer Tipton, lighting designers.

The TheatreNow! website (http://hamiltondramaturgystheatrenow.com) continues to attract many visitors. Helaine’s design and archiving expertise show off the podcasts well.

2014 will bring an expansion of the program, and a posting of new podcasts, including Maria Alexandria Beech, Murielle Borst Tarrant, and Judith Malina, to complete Season Three.

Thank you for all your support and I am looking forward to expanding the program in 2014.

Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the purposes of Hamilton Dramaturgy’s TheatreNow! must be made payable to Fractured Atlas and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.